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#22: Two Online Teaching Best Practices That Matter

#22: Two Online Teaching Best Practices That Matter

Starting the new school year, there are two online teaching best practices that matter most. Putting these two practices front and center will help you get your class off to a great start and ensure that it keeps running smoothly.

  1. Be present.
  2. Communicate your norms or expectations clearly, and effectively.

In today’s podcast, I’ll share some strategies to help you develop presence in y our online class. Then, we’ll take a deep dive into communicating with your students.

 

#20: Helping Inexperienced Students Who are New to Online

#20: Helping Inexperienced Students Who are New to Online

Are you helping inexperienced students who are new to online learning?

Students come into our online classes with varying backgrounds. Yet one group needs extra structure. And they are inexperienced students, who are new to online learning.

There are many ways to meet the needs of students who are new to online learning.

Some need additional structure, tools, and help.

Others just need a guide to learn how to navigate the online classroom.

Regardless of the tools that will work best for your own students, this podcast brings many ideas to help you prepare.

#18: Healthy Sleep when Teaching Online

#18: Healthy Sleep when Teaching Online

Have you wondered why anyone would be concerned about getting healthy sleep while teaching online?

The main idea behind online education is that it can be done anytime, anywhere. With no boundaries, this type of work can easily take additional time and energy.

For example, instead of working with a group of students all at once, teachers often write comments and feedback each individual student. This might happen more than one way, every week. 

At first, this work might be surprising to anyone new to online teaching.

After getting used to the idea of regularly reaching each student, balancing one’s time and energy becomes important in order to continue teaching well and to maintain work-life balance.

And, healthy sleep while teaching online is a critical part of the balance.

Here are some great resources you might want to explore:

Resources listed here were consulted to prepare today’s podcast:

https://www.sleepadvisor.org/remote-work-sleep/

https://www.online.umich.edu/courses/sleep-deprivation-habits-solutions-and-strategies-teach-out/all-reviews/

https://www.sleepdr.com/the-sleep-blog/the-effects-of-sleep-deprivation-on-work-performance/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4610176/

https://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/tired-at-work

#16: Be Authentic while Teaching Online

#16: Be Authentic while Teaching Online

Because online teaching is known for its isolation, how can we be authentic while teaching online?

The answer to this question is to see the humanity in our students. And, to get to know them as people. Of course, this can be challenging with a large class, grading demands, and other competing demands.

In today’s podcast, I’ll share strategies to help you be authentic while teaching online.

Wiley Educational Research

Wiley Educational Research

Today, I saw the Wiley Educational Research posted on Linkedin. You can view it here: https://edservices.wiley.com/ .

What does it mean for online education?

First, the researchers have been conducting this study repeatedly for several years. They report having surveyed over 15,000 fully online learners during the bast many years. I’ve used some of their reported statistics and trends in my own work, and particularly in my recent book Teaching Music Appreciation Online. I believe the data is useful and adds insight to online higher education.

Second, it’s unclear whether any survey respondents were impacted by COVID-19 yet, because the authors noted that data were collected in January and February 2020. Broad effects of the pandemic did not impact higher education until late March 2020 and onward. Regardless, the needs and preferences of online learners are well represented under normal circumstances. Next year’s report will definitely be worth a look!

Here are some of the key insights that returned this year:

  • Online learners prefer to take classes from institutions located close to home
  • Online learners typically prefer affordability and reputation when choosing where to enroll

And, new findings about what online learners really want include the following:

  • Pride in the institution and are willing to pay more tuition for an institution’s reputation
  • The fastest route to completing the program and speed throughout the process (including applying, accepting transfer credits, and goal achievement)
  • Specific programs (and they will go elsewhere to find it rather than opting for an on-campus option)
  • Career services
  • Options to learn via mobile devices

As we look to the future of online education, considering the preferences and needs of online students will help us continue to provide what they most want.